US Airways Magazine is running my Wise Bread article Understand Capital Costs in their section “The Gist.”  It appears on page 22 of the October 2009 issue.  I got my contributors copies in the mail today.

I’m not sure what day they actually change out the magazine onboard the planes, but I assume for the next month or so airline passengers will be reading my article!

As part of the publicity related to the publication of the Wise Bread book, I’ve got a guest post up at Get Rich Slowly in which I advocate that you be a bon vivant.

A bon vivant is a person who lives well — someone who enjoys the best things in life, especially with regard to food and drink. The stereotypical bon vivant is someone who can afford the best (or has generous friends), but that’s not the only way. You can be a bon vivant on a budget.

What is “the best” anyway? Your own tastes play the biggest role, but the tastes of family and friends have a strong influence. To a lesser extent, so do the tastes of opinion leaders, celebrities, experts, and others — even fictional characters. Because of this, appreciating the finer things in life makes you vulnerable to serious “keeping up with the Joneses” issues.

There are a lot of ways to fight this.

My working title was “Be a bon vivant,” but JD thought it would tie in with his site better as How to Live a Rich Life — On a Budget.

An Education of Scars” is up at Futurismic edited by Christopher East (fiction editor) and Paul Raven (publisher and editor-in-chief).

Her gown left her shoulders bare. Her skin was pale, translucent. She had no freckles, as if she had never gone out in the sun. Her lips were colored a shade of red that seemed odd for a red-head to wear, until I noticed that it was the same angry red as her scars.

It seems that someone translated my Wise Bread post The line between frugal and crazy into Turkish:

http://www.tutumluol.com/tutumlu-ile-cimri-arasindaki-ince-cizgi/

I’m  kind of chuffed about this–translating a whole article is a lot of work; I’m pleased that there’s someone out there who thought this article was worth the trouble.  I hope it’s a good translation–it’s kind of hard to tell, based on the Google translation:

Nature of diseased condition that does not bring happiness. At this point the question must be asked is: Does it make you happy to make thrifty behavior? In this way, make you happy is to live a frugal man, you are normal and others that it does not matter what you think. For example, to use bicycles for transportation or walk to me very happy.

I picked up two nice mentions for Wise Bread articles.

Lifehacker, in a piece by Jason Fitzpatrick, linked to my most recent post, Plan for your wants, in an article that they called Plan for your wants to make budgeting enjoyable.

And, in a piece by Farhad Manjoo, Slate included my post Not the sort of person who (along with mentions for Wise Bread in general and my personal site) among The best Web sites to help you scrimp through the recession.